Increase Local Food and Product Delivery Orders with Facebook Ads

Online to offline activation has always been a unique challenge for quick serve restaurants (QSR) and consumer product (CPG) brands who want to reach the millions of consumers on social media, but also need to compel them to buy from a brick and mortar location. The recent business challenges brought forth by the COVID-19 pandemic have suddenly made the second part of the online to offline funnel quite difficult. Though this does not mean QSR and CPG brands do not have options. 

Recent innovations with app delivery services were already moving in to help middle man the online/offline divide by connecting consumers with delivery contractors to deliver food. With more people staying home, but also still needing to eat, one might expect delivery demand to be on an upward swing in the coming months. So what does local social look like when you can’t rely on driving footfall to a brick and mortar location, but also still need to generate ROI for your multi-location QSRs or CPG clients?

It’s simple really: 

  1. Hyper-targeted local ads for every one of your locations, reaching users in the immediate vicinity within delivery range.

  2. Campaigns are published through the local stores Facebook Page, but direct users to order through the delivery service.

  3. Deliver increased sales for the store location, while also promoting the brand’s products, by driving consumers right to the point of sale. 

 

The strategy, while simple, rests on execution. Reaching consumers with highly-targeted, local ads is not easy to do at scale. But the extra effort pays big performance dividends. By publishing unique campaigns for each location, focused on their unique sales area, and through their local pages, you gain the benefits of locality.

First, you deliver a more relevant ad to the local consumer; they see an ad from a local business profile in their neighborhood. This is important, whether you are working with a chain or independent businesses. You want to be serving an ad to consumers that feels like it’s from their store – their favorite taco shop or their community drugstore, and not some far off product or brand. That familiarity with ads plus the ability for users to jump straight into the ordering experience is a potent combination. It’s an approach the Facebook bidding system likes too, because more relevant ads often cost less to deliver.

At Tiger Pistol, we partnered with a quick service ice cream shop and a delivery service to fulfill local campaigns. Ads were geo-targeted for the delivery partners and restaurants combined sales area. The creative of the ads focused on the individual store and their food offerings, but each ad’s “Order Now” button drove to the delivery partner’s online ordering page for the store. This national-to-local partnership approach resulted in an increase of customers who clicked through to order by more than 620%, increasing sales, and driving desired outcomes for both partners. Being able to deploy robust local ads quickly, with a means to rapidly direct consumers to the point of purchases remotely, is not only a strategy for the challenges of today, but more importantly, a future-proof strategy as more consumers move their buying habits to fully digital.

SMB Resellers and Agencies: How to Make the Most of the Conversions Objective

Whether you’re an agency or an SMB reseller that delivers ads for small businesses, you’ve probably heard about Facebook’s Conversion Marketing Objective. Perhaps you have been wary of trying it out, or maybe you’ve tried it and found yourself navigating the difficult choice of what exact type of conversion to optimize for. In either case, Facebook’s Conversion and Attribution measurement tools have received numerous additions and refinements over the last few years, and the value advertisers derive from these improvements has specifically sparked popularity for the Conversions Campaign Objective, which optimizes the delivery of your Facebook Campaign specifically towards a conversion event, rather than say, a website click or person reached. 

ROI is, of course, the ultimate goal of any advertising effort, so one might naturally ask, “Why would I ever choose an objective that’s not conversion optimized?”, or even “Why would I choose to optimize towards anything but purchase conversions?” It turns out the latter is the more complicated question, but one you can answer when armed with the right information. It all has to do with how Facebook’s ad bidding works, which involves a combination of factors: your advertiser bid, estimated action rates (i.e. how your target audience responds to the ad), and overall ad quality. As Facebook notes, “together, estimated action rates and ad quality measure ad relevance. In fact, we subsidize relevant ads in auctions, so more relevant ads often cost less and see more results.”

Let’s think about what this means in the conversions context, using a simple example of a local golf supply shop with an online store on their website. Naturally, they want to move as much product as possible, and focus their targeting efforts on people interested in golf. So they set up a Conversions Objective Campaign targeting people interested in golf. Let’s set aside for a moment the question of which conversion event they should choose. Instead, let’s first illustrate how optimization works between the Facebook objective and target audience:

Breaking this equation down, first we have our target audience, a combination of the golf store’s sales area and customer base, or simply “people interested in golf.” A lot of people on Facebook are likely interested in golf products, but only some of them probably use, buy, or browse products regularly. This is where Facebook’s optimization comes in to help, as it tries to identify those users in the pool of people “interested in golf products” who are likely to take the chosen action of the Facebook objective. 

In this example, we have chosen the Conversions Objective, so you can think of it as a hierarchy. We want people interested in golf, who are likely to convert. Another way of thinking about it is this results in a smaller pool of users that becomes our “real” or ideal target audience – the “convertors” among those interested in golf. This leads us nicely back to the question of the conversion action to optimize for, as this will modify who Facebook identifies as the most likely to take the conversion action in the “convertors” group. 

Facebook’s own provided guidance on the matter is as follows: “We recommend optimizing for a conversion that occurs at least 100 times per month without running any ads. If your website doesn’t get at least that many conversions without ads, it’s very unlikely that we’ll be able to find enough converters through ads for your ad set to be successful.” Additionally, they also note that purchases are the “rarest type of conversion” Or perhaps, more precisely said, typically the most expensive type of conversion.

In the end, it all boils down to Pixel data and which actions can be tracked on your website through the Pixel. Facebook’s guidance recommends that you should only consider the Conversions Objective if you have a history of 100 Pixel fires on “page view,” “add to cart,” and similar type events. This context helps us in selecting conversion events, but what about the strategic decisions, especially for an SMB who has a more limited advertising budget?

The key is to adapt and learn. For an SMB with website traffic in the low thousands per month, you likely won’t have enough purchase actions tracked on specific products to reliably optimize “purchase” events right of the gate, and you may find that even if you do, it’s still not as cost effective as optimizing toward more common conversion events, like “view content,” “add to cart,” or “add to wishlist.” For example, “add to cart” instead tells Facebook to look for users in the “interested in golf convertors” pool who are showing purchase-intent behavior, as opposed to verifiable conversions, like “purchases.” Remember, there are always going to be less purchasers relative to more common conversion events, unless of course your business’ conversion rate is 100% (wouldn’t that be nice?).

When optimizing towards people showing purchase intent, you are potentially gaining more cost effective targeting, as those users will be easier to reach, because, of course, these are not exacting parameters. Maybe I, for example, viewed a golf product on a big box store’s website and opted not to buy the product after adding it to my cart. Perhaps, I simply forgot to checkout or changed my mind at the last minute. The Facebook Pixel captures this behavior and recognizes me as one of the users showing purchase intent on golf products. Maybe when I see an ad for the SMB golf store, I like the price or the quality better, and opt to purchase from them immediately. The golf store just got a lower cost conversion by optimizing towards purchase intent. 

The possibilities are infinite, but it is important to keep in mind how Facebook’s optimization and objectives work when making these decisions. There is never going to be a “one size fits” all approach when it comes to choosing the right conversion event to optimize for, but through smart data analysis and guided testing, you can make the Conversions Objective work for just about any business with a website with a bit of traffic. 

Learn how Tiger Pistol puts the Conversion Objective to work at scale. Request a Demo Today!

Chris Mayer, a Solutions Engineer at Tiger Pistol, specializes in helping digital agencies, SMB resellers, and global brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation. 

Are Facebook CPMs Rising? Depends How Local You Go.

The Story of How a Simple Hunch is Transforming Social Advertising

A recent industry news article cited that Facebook’s CPM (cost-per-thousand impressions) grew by 122 percent. With our considerable amount of historical campaign data, we couldn’t help but wonder if Tiger Pistol’s Facebook Advertising CPMs were rising at the same rate. 

SPOILER ALERT: They’re Not. Not Even Close.

We don’t like to throw the word “hero” around, but this origin story shows exactly how our simple hunch is transforming social advertising. 

What's Up with WhatsApp Ads

What’s Up With WhatApp Ads?

WhatsApp ads are coming! Well actually, they’re already here, but they are expected to be coming again in 2020, only this time, in-app. It was only just over a year ago, in October of 2018, that Facebook enabled “click to WhatsApp” ads, which allowed marketers to deploy ads that allowed users to click direct into a WhatsApp conversation with a business. These features further evolved into the concept of “WhatsApp Business” – a separate app specifically for business owners using WhatsApp, that launched in April 2019.

Facebook’s development of their WhatsApp advertising offerings has been a slow burn since they acquired the Platform in 2014. Generally speaking, up until recently, WhatsApp was treated more independently of Facebook’s other major acquired property, Instagram. Instagram fully opened to advertisers in 2015, just 3 years after being acquired.

WhatsApp Business includes the ability to set up Business Profiles on WhatsApp as well as more distinct tools for business communication, such as auto-responses, and away messages. These WhatsApp changes are foundational, and a necessary step to fully unlock the advertising potential of the WhatsApp platform, with the expected launch of new ad formats that originate in WhatsApp, rather than taking users to it. It’s clear that Facebook likely has bigger plans for WhatsApp in mind.

Investing in WhatsApp’s advertising functionality is a no-brainer for Facebook, by the numbers, WhatsApp represents one of their largest, most engaged properties:

  • 1 billion WhatsApp accounts are active every day.
  • 1.5 billion WhatsApp accounts are active every month
  • 2 billion minutes of calls every day.
  • 450 million WhatsApp accounts are active on WhatsApp Status every day.

With such a massive user base using the Platform regularly, WhatsApp promises to be the next evolution of Facebook’s social advertising tools. However, though it should be mentioned, there is just one major caveat to the rise of WhatsApp, Facebook’s home market, the United States, doesn’t really use it. Facebook’s answer to this, has been to position Messenger as the go-to messaging option for advertisers in the US. In either case, WhatsApp’s emergence is a sign of the times. Messaging is to become a bigger part of the consumer experience and advertisers will be required to evolve to meet this new challenge, and we have every reason to believe that WhatsApp will be the first battleground.

What opportunity does WhatsApp represent? Better consumer data and experiences namely, in addition to considerable ROI potential for businesses large and small. A few examples from Facebook on early adopters:

PlayKids,  an education Platform for kids, saw a 90% decrease in lapsed subscribers when they started using WhatsApp Business to communicate directly with their customers over phone and email.

Sale Stock, an Indonesian fashion business, took a similar approach and began using WhatsApp Business as their primary communication channel. It quickly became their number one source of inbound chat traffic, with 90% of the messages delivered by Sale Stock read by their customers.

What makes WhatsApp and messaging-based social activations so exciting is their ability to generate both positive customer outcomes in addition to ROI for the business. This is especially true at scale. One additional case study comes from the Dubai-based logistics company Aramex. To date they’ve served over one million customers through WhatsApp Business, and saw a 19% decrease in inbound call volume to their support center since making the transition. What’s more, 41% of all shipment inquiries are now handled through WhatsApp.

One thing these case studies all have in common is they all involve integrating WhatsApp into customer service channels – the advertising elements only surfacing in the very bottom funnel, where messaging is deployed to drive retention and re-purchase. In part, this is not unexpected given that it’s much easier for businesses to communicate with existing customers rather than potential ones through direct messaging. To think that messaging could lead a customer acquisition strategy is a notion fraught with caveat and complication. While it may not ever be the leading strategy for some industries, it can be a compelling strategic element even in cases where proactive conversation is not already embedded in the sales process.

Imagine running an awareness or traffic campaign in WhatsApp, and retargeting people who viewed the ads, watched X% of the video, or viewed a product page with a direct message. Alternatively, immediate follow-ups off the back of WhatsApp ad clicks present another interesting frame, to instigate driving conversions via direct or bot-driven consumer communication. The possibilities are endless, but it can’t happen until Facebook’s tools catch up.

In the last year, Facebook has made the foundational steps for both WhatsApp and Messenger to play a larger role in advertising. The next step is a fuller integration with existing advertising tools by launching WhatsApp Ad formats with direct placement on WhatsApp and lowering the barrier of entry for advertisers.

I suspect 2020 may finally be that year where messaging as a distinct tactic, rather than an afterthought, within the Facebook marketing funnel will be fully realized. And soon our notion of a “social media campaign” might just change a bit to not only include targeting consumers on social media, but talking to them as well. Who knows, you may even find yourself reporting on “Conversations Started” in between discussing impressions and CPCs.

Ready to simplify social advertising, and enable local activation at global scale? Contact Tiger Pistol today.

After earning his Masters in Mass Communications in 2015, Chris Mayer worked at Facebook prior to joining Tiger Pistol as a Project Manager. He specializes in helping digital agencies and national brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation. Outside the office, he enjoys, basketball, Formula One, and sharing opinions on film and television.

The Retail Q5: Secrets to Maximizing Holiday Social Advertising Campaign Impact

The Retail Q5: Secrets to Maximizing Holiday Social Advertising Campaign Impact

The holiday season has arrived which means a deluge of mega sales, cyber deals, and the like. For small and large retailers, this time of year is often a boon to their bottom line, as everyone gets out to shop. And while everyone has read a headline (or two, or three…) about the “death of retail” with the advent of online shopping, in actuality, retail sales are expected to grow during the holiday period this year. The National Retail Federation forecasts a sales increase of 3.8% and 4.2% for retailers in the November-December period. Additionally noting that that despite what you might expect, retail sales have actually averaged 3.7% annual increase for the past five years.

The heightened emphasis on shopping is also a boon for advertisers, of course, as brands flood all of our social feeds and airwaves with hot deals. Not to mention the ever present cadre of e-commerce offerings also trying to break through. In fact, spending on digital ads is also expected to increase as more advertisers shift their efforts to social media advertising over television and print. Naturally, much of this social media spending will go to Facebook. It can seem especially difficult, especially for SMB retailers, to break through the noise. But there is hope, if you know how to game the system, to be able to maximize the impact of your Facebook ads. There is this concept of the “Q5” which references the ~15 day period during just before and after the holidays where the lead time on ground shipping makes shopping online difficult. You’ll hear differing definitions on the exact time frame, and there is a regional element too, as not everyone lives within 1 or 2 day shipping distances. 

Q5 is of particular import for retailers, but it is also an important consideration for advertisers. For smaller retailers looking to maximize their impact, this period represents an incredible opportunity to get noticed. Larger CPG brands, even if working a more long tail holiday advertising strategy, can also seize on this moment to further enrich their campaign strategy. Think about what “Q5” means; if you’re a retailer, you’re the only game in town in a lot of regions, due to shipping constraints. Secondly, with all the traditional emphasis on pre-holiday shopping, it is easy to discount post-holiday shopping, where many consumers are still off work and now also equipped with gift cards and gift receipt returns. Advertisers should not leave this potential revenue for their retail clients on the table. The third advantage of the Q5 period is that pre-holiday campaigns will also have ended, presenting the potential for lower rates on digital ads. 

Think about the strategic possibilities Q5 brings for awareness or reach campaigns in the few days leading up to the holidays to catch any procrastinators who need last minute gifts as they shop for others. Then subsequent campaigns in the week leading up and through the new year to capture folks who now have extra time and gift money to shop for themselves. Getting local is key to this strategy, even if you are servicing a larger CPG brand who sells through big box retailers. You will need ads that are locally relevant to get noticed and ensure you reach consumers within reasonable travel distance to shop in-store. 

Last year, Tiger Pistol ran holiday campaigns that covered the Q5 period for a beverage brand to drive consumers to the nearest retailer or restaurant to enjoy their products. Our technology produced thousands of local ads, each individualized to the brick and mortar location, powered by the brand’s creative resources. Consumers who were near a particular location would see ads pointing them to the nearest stores. Not only did our CPM’s beat national averages, which made the brand happy, but it was also a win for the locations too, who were happy at the potential of increased foot traffic during a period where their traditional advertising efforts had slowed.

Whether it’s through coordination between global brands and their independent retailers, or concentrated effort between a global CPG brand and big box retailer, the benefits of strategizing to the Q5 period are there for the taking. It’s just a matter of leveraging the right tools to ensure you can get in front of consumers where they are already spending most of their time (i.e. their Facebook and Instagram feeds) and serve them relevant creative. Most importantly, these local ads must represent the path of least resistance between the consumer and the on-site purchase. You can do this through the use of hyper local geo-targeting with integrated geo-navigation to the nearest location. Even better, you can also  further incentivize them with easily redeemable offers and specials from their mobile devices. So while we all want to start planning execution strategies for the new year, don’t sleep on the end of the year, as you might miss the chance to impress your retail clients and the opportunity to start 2020 off with a major win for both you and them. 

Ready to simplify social advertising, and enable local activation at global scale? Contact Tiger Pistol today.

What Facebook’s New Campaign Budget Optimization Rules Mean for Your Company

From September of this year, Facebook began requiring all of its advertisers using native tools to utilize Campaign Budget Optimization. “CBO,” as it’s now known, is a feature that was first introduced back in November 2017, but has since been optional until now. It represents a fundamental shift in how budgets are managed on Facebook, moving them from the Ad Set level to the campaign level and contrasting with the original hierarchy that left budget management to the ad set level, where audiences and placements are set. With CBO enabled, Facebook will now automatically distribute budgets dynamically across ad sets within a campaign based on performance. 

Facebook highlights three key benefits to the change:

  1. Maximizes the total value of an advertiser’s campaign, as budget automatically shifts between ad sets in real-time based on performance.
  2. Helps lower the cost per result and increase return on ad spend.
  3. Saves advertisers time by eliminating the need to manually shift budgets between ad sets.

These benefits all pass the “smell test,” at least in terms of logic. No longer having to worry about shifting budgets manually? Putting more dollars into the best performing ad sets? It all sounds great in theory. 

In truth, Facebook’s CBO requirement only applies to advertisers working in Facebook’s native tools, Business, and Ads Manager. Tiger Pistol made the decision to shift all campaigns published through our tools to CBO in concert with the requirement to native advertisers. While the thought of any loss of control over campaign management commonly instills fear in digital marketers, Tiger Pistol has proven time and time again how ad automation nets out positively for advertisers. CBO represents another move toward further automation from Facebook.  

Worried about what CBO means for your campaigns? If you are a seasoned Facebook advertising veteran, it is likely you are no stranger to the tactics that underly CBO:

CBO is going to do what you’re probably already doing 

If you’re a regular at the Tiger Pistol Blog, you know one of our favorite testing automations that Tiger Pistol’s Platform provides is Audience testing. If you’ve been spending time running campaigns in Business Manager, you probably have been manually trying to mimic variable Ad Set budgets across your different audiences – checking every week and shifting dollars as CPX rise and fall. CBO is simply going to do this for you.

You’re probably guessing most of the time when you partition your budgets. 

Unless you painstakingly tested one audience parameter at a time and have a magic eight ball to account for seasonality and ever-changing user behavior, do you really know which among your stacked custom audiences, or that collection of interests you’ve curated, is going to outperform the other? More than likely you have a bit of data to know you’re audiences are relevant, but you don’t have certainty in terms of which is going to drive the best performance at any given time. CBO accounts for this, as it waits for performance data then simply shifts budgets away from underperforming audiences and more into the ones that drive conversions.

Humans are slower than computers. 

And of course, CBO, powered by machine learning, operates in real-time. Even in the most ideal of conditions, humans simply are not able to match an optimization computer that can take instantaneous action. CBO ultimately leaves the time-sensitive actions to the computer and frees up marketers to focus more on what they’re good at – strategy.

The move to CBO is another in a growing line of changes by Facebook to encourage advertisers to take further advantage of automation and machine learning. Automation being the core of the Tiger Pistol toolset, CBO has the potential to make what we already do better – create campaigns that respond and optimize to user behavior in real-time – while also enabling advertisers to glean new testing insights to further supercharge their campaigns. This is especially important as both social budgets and number of advertisers continue to grow. It will be those whom best take advantage of automation that will ultimately rise above the rest.

Ready to take advantage of Tiger Pistol’s CBO tools at scale? Contact us today! 

After earning his Masters in Mass Communications in 2015, Chris Mayer worked at Facebook prior to joining Tiger Pistol as a Project Manager. He specializes in helping digital agencies and national brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation. Outside the office, he enjoys, basketball, Formula One, and sharing opinions on film and television.

eBook: Best Practice Facebook Advertising for Enterprise Brands

Facebook recently released their “Power 5” Best Practices. While these social advertising best practices are relevant to all types of Facebook Advertising, they can get harder to implement for multi-location brands. In our latest eBook, “Best Practice Facebook Advertising for Enterprise Brands,” we’ll cover how easy it can be for enterprise brands to locally activate their social advertising at scale – complete with impactful use cases. 

How Value-Added Resellers and Agencies Can Start Selling Social Advertising Profitably

With Facebook SMB ad spend continuing to grow year on year, social media has become an established channel in the SMB market. The unique qualities of social advertising present new challenges for digital agencies and service providers for SMBs, particularly the question of how to fulfill social ads both at scale and cost-effectively.

Unlike search PPC advertising, which requires mostly keywords and a simple sentence of ad copy, social advertising mimics traditional advertising by requiring rich media content and copy variation that’s built upon acquisition strategies to delve deeper than simply “X person is searching for Y.”

With these advanced needs, digital service providers, whom serve thousands of advertisers with small core operations teams, must have ready access to scalable fulfillment operations. Many turn to ad-tech providers to enable the operational efficiency required for a scaled social advertising solution.

Tiger Pistol enables scale for digital agencies through an innovative approach to social ad fulfillment. When you combine turnkey solutions with smart automation, it becomes simple for any agency, large or small, to build a social ads program that is both profitable for them and their clients.

The first element that is key to scale is end-advertiser on-boarding. With the ability to integrate with CRMs, customer records are easily translated into the Tiger Pistol Platform. We also make managing communication with end-advertisers easy with automated emails available for every step of the social advertising experience, from acquiring page permissions and providing reporting dashboards to even delivering leads. With these tools, on-boarding end-advertisers really can be no-touch through Tiger Pistol.

When it comes to ad fulfillment, the platform enables an operational framework that is as efficient as it is scalable. Like standing up a search PPC campaign, which typically involves 15 minutes of keyword selection and some light copywriting, Tiger Pistol takes a similar approach with our customer libraries.

 

Our Platform’s campaign library model allows for simple and quick one-time on-boarding to enable SMBs to advertise on Facebook effectively. With a set of clear Ad Objectives that are curated based on SMB needs (Traffic, Leads, Awareness, or Offers), campaign assets are organized into four libraries Audience, Media, Copy, and Call-to-Action and tailored to the chosen objective. Digital agencies can simply upload a set of campaign images, write copy variants, create audiences and then let Tiger Pistol’s smart automation do the rest of the work.

To ensure campaigns continuously drive the best performance, Tiger Pistol automates A/B testing. Not only does this reduce ad fatigue by creating fresh campaigns every month, it allows our machine learning to make performance-driven decisions to improve ad performance over time. It is in this way that a simple, a sub-15 minute campaign build process provides agencies the ability to manage thousands of end-advertisers cost efficiently. While being able to bring to market a social offering with all the benefits of a traditional marketing agency – customization, A/B testing, and performance-driven optimization.

Ready to simplify your social advertising and enable local activation at global scale? Contact Tiger Pistol today! 

After earning his Masters in Mass Communications in 2015, Chris Mayer worked at Facebook prior to joining Tiger Pistol as a Project Manager. He specializes in helping digital agencies and national brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation.

Reinventing Advertising in the Age of Privacy

On May 14, 2019 Facebook announced a set of new changes that allow their users to take more control of “Off-Facebook Activity” tracking. This change effectively includes two new changes for advertisers. First, Facebook will now expose to end-users which organizations are utilizing Facebook tools to collect data on them. This is inclusive of, “a list of the apps and websites someone visits that use our business tools such as the Facebook pixel, SDK, and API.” In addition, Facebook is including a new feature to allow its users to opt-out of off-Facebook site tracking.

Facebook has had a difficult year with continual PR challenges related to privacy, starting with the news of Cambridge Analytica, a third-party firm that gained access to the private information of nearly 50 million Facebook users.1 This data was later sold and used in ad targeting. Facebook responded relatively swiftly and moved to block third-party data input into its Platform’s advertising tools.2 This also included the CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerburg being called to testify before the US Congress on the data breach.3

It is clear that 2019 is very much the year of privacy, as Facebook is not alone in their efforts to improve their user privacy tools. Mozilla, recently announced new user data security features to be included in their upcoming updates to their popular ‘Firefox’ web browser.4 Google, who controls two-thirds of the global Internet browser market share through their browser Chrome, announced new security and data privacy features in April.5

For digital advertisers, the attempts of browser developers and social media platforms to reduce passive user tracking may sound scary. And the changes may bring some new challenges for those who never paid the issue any mind. For the most part though, the changes should not prevent social advertisers from being able to leverage user data. The new world just means they will have to collect the data more openly.

Let’s focus on Facebook’s reasoning more specifically and look to how we as advertisers can shift our approaches to ensure we can continue to deliver results for our clients;

1. Giving people transparency and control is good for businesses.

It’s hard to argue with this logic, Facebook itself is a prime example of how a lack of transparency and control can be bad for bottom lines. As advertisers, we should be open-sharing where our data comes from. At the end of the day, targeted ads see better engagement6 – suggesting most users don’t necessarily mind seeing ads for products they are genuinely interested in.

2.  We’re showing people how advertisers use our tools.

This does mean more exposure for advertisers, but it is in the same vein as transparency; advertisers who collect data openly and use it to target relevant consumers have nothing to hide in how they use it. This is another change that will likely only hurt the bad actors.

3. This feature may impact targeting.

When someone disconnects his/her off-Facebook activity, advertisers can no longer use the data they clear for targeting. While it is hard to prognosticate how many users will clear this data, it is perhaps the most concerning of all the changes. As it means it will be more difficult to passively track some users, as they now have a means to proactively opt-out.

However, there are still many tried and true means of collecting first-party data. For one, POS and customer loyalty data, which via outside collection (read: not tracked via website behavior), is still fair game, as is any other form of active data collection that consumers may have already opted into. So long as Facebook advertisers have access to this data, we still have a way into the most powerful of Facebook’s audience targeting tools: Lookalikes.

4. Measurement will remain intact.

We can all breathe easy. While we may have to adjust how we collect data, it’s just going to take putting more effort into transparency and outside sources. Facebook is still Facebook, and advertisers we will still be able to track ROAS on our lookalike, conversion, retargeting, and whatever other audiences we can come up with.

Whether we like it or not, the digital age is evolving to be more open and transparent. As advertisers, we share in the responsibility to evolve with the times to ensure we can continue to deliver meaningful results for our clients. Not only for our bottom lines, but most importantly the consumers we collectively serve.

Ready to simplify social advertising, and enable local activation at global scale? Contact Tiger Pistol today.

After earning his Masters in Mass Communications in 2015, Chris Mayer worked at Facebook prior to joining Tiger Pistol as a Project Manager. He specializes in helping digital agencies and national brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation. Outside the office, he enjoys, basketball, Formula One, and sharing opinions on film and television.

1NY Times ‘Facebook and Cambridge Analytica: What You Need to Know as Fallout Widens’
2Techcrunch ‘Facebook will cut off access to third party data for ad targeting’
3The Guardian ‘The key moments from Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony to Congress’
4Forbes ‘Firefox Takes Aim At Google With A Bunch Of New Security Features’
5TechCrunch ‘What Chromes browsers changes mean for your privacy and security’
6Marketing Land ’10 Steps To Target And Connect With Potential Customers Effectively’

How Can My Brand Best Use Our Locations to Drive Foot Traffic or Leads Through Social Advertising?

Most brands have robust national advertising campaigns, and while these are important for driving broad awareness through activation via traditional channels, they ultimately lack a local touchpoint that allows them to reach potential customers when and where it counts. Social media enables brands to activate locally, reaching consumers on their social media feeds throughout the day- where they spend most of their time.

As a national brand, you have two challenges when it comes to advertising:

  1.     Communicating your brand message and product positioning at scale
  2.     Activating local consumers to visit your locations in their area

Facebook advertising through Tiger Pistol is built to meet these challenges. What does it look like? Let’s take a look at two examples: 1) CPG brand that sells through independent businesses, and 2) A national financial services brand that sells through sales agents.

1)    Taking a CPG brand from Global to Local:

Through a local program, locations that sell your products can advertise both their business and your products at the same time.

For example, promoting your latest product, Tiger Pistol helps scale a national campaign locally by publishing your product messaging via the individual location’s page.

global campaign promotes your product, but can only indirectly promote the locations where your consumers can actually purchase it. Consumers will need to take extra steps to discover where they can buy your product.

Turning this into a local campaign can super charge this activation by promoting sales through local channels.

Notice, the local campaign is still brand controlled, but the call to action is now local, driving sales directly to the point of consumption. This way, your marketing dollars now drive local sales more efficiently, by directing consumers exactly where they need to go to buy.

To enrich their campaigns, Creature Coffee can utilize their corporate data, such as web traffic, to their product pages to segment their consumers. Through local campaigns this data can be geo-fenced for the individual locations to leverage in their campaign targeting along with a means to show potential customers the products they are most interested in.

This same tactic can work with services too!

global campaign promotes your services, but again, imperfect for driving local action. For Insurance Co., consumers must take the steps of finding an agent to get to the point of purchase.

local campaign maintains the brand message and positioning of the service, but now consumers can engage directly with agents and submit their contact information to start the buying process more efficiently.

 

Insurance Co. can now easily funnel leads to agents by retargeting their website visitors and customer data while also capturing new leads directly in their local agent’s service area.

Both of the above examples show how a global campaign can be re-positioned to activate locally. But how do you measure success? It’s really no different at the local level. It’s simply additive by including the end-location within the strategic framework. For Creature Coffee, this means driving sales at their independent locations and measuring foot traffic. Both serve the global KPIs of promoting the Creature Coffee product and the local KPI for Joe’s Coffee Shop with happy customers right through their door.

For Insurance Co., a global-to-local campaign can measure responses both locally and in aggregate. Agents gain value with a means to be proactively involved with their individual sales processes. Through a personalized campaign using brand assets and messaging from Insurance Co. Even better, it’s a win for customers because now they can reach out to Insurance Co. agents directly to engage in the buying process.

Ready to simplify social advertising, and enable local activation at global scale? Contact Tiger Pistol today.

After earning his Masters in Mass Communications in 2015, Chris Mayer worked at Facebook prior to joining Tiger Pistol as a Project Manager. He specializes in helping digital agencies and national brands build scaled Facebook advertising solutions with an emphasis on local activation. Outside the office, he enjoys, basketball, Formula One, and sharing opinions on film and television.

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